Sunday, October 30, 2005

Thursday, October 27, 2005

All Your Base Belong to Google

What is up with Google Base (2)? People are speculating that it's an eBay killer. Between Google's Google Talk (targetting Skype) and the Google Wallet (no pal to PayPal), it seems like a pattern is emerging. Google for all of its size and power is still a B-level player. We don't need them like we need Microsoft. What else is of the size of a Google? eBay. While every is expecting AJAX to power an application turf war between Google and Microsoft, what if that were the master of a all feints? Word processing-- with spell checking, formatting, piping content to the printer, etc.-- is still pretty processor intensive. Anything delivered to the desktop will have to be bulkier and sloppier than compiled code, otherwise you have to issue platform specific apps. In this era of paranoia, few people are going to accept downloads from anyone, even if its Google.
So, what requires sharing? What is it that people love? What is it that people want information about as soon as possible? Money. You need other people to give you money and you need goods in exchange. We love money. We want our money as soon as we can get it. eBay has a lock on the online auction world, but it never has nailed the real time auction. Remember when Google entered the search engine market? Back in 1998, Northern Lights was the rising star and Altavista was the hulk. Northern Lights in a footnote and Altavista is a shadow of its former self. If Google can have auctioneers, financial traders, hog farmers and flower ladies vending their wares realtime, eBay will become so much pig latin. How could they try to get ready for such a move? Release something like GMail to test near realtime transmission of information. Expand on the concept with GoogleTalk. Now, Google Base where you can post anything. Once they ruggedize the fast indexing, people will be allowed to comment of items, rate their validity and put their money where their mouth is: they'll be allowed to bid on items or commit to purchase them, opening their Google Wallet and plunking down some hard earned AdSense money. Best of all, Google could continue their march of AdWords: run a scroll beside the content and you, the seller or buyer, won't have to pay listing fees. That means that Google won't have to generate bad will by cancelling deadbeat accounts; or handing a huge bill to a seller who was lucky. On top of all this: Google Base could allow for the sale of content: you list the synopsis and for some cash, you can have the media. Why, you could store a link to it in your Gmail account so that you pay for it once and you can use it as often as you wish. How could eBay and Craigslist compete with that?

BTW, who is Gabbo?

Friday, October 21, 2005

Take control of Command

In Unix, you can up-arrow to almost any prior command and save yourself a lot of typing. In old DOS, it used to be F3. In Windows XP, it's gone. You have to either mark and paste commands again and again. It SUCKS.
How do you avoid this? Stop using command.com. Next time, use cmd instead. Most of the same functionality with the history feature.

tags : Linux newbies

Thursday, October 20, 2005

Pete Freitag, You're my Hero

The Pete Freitag is full of COOL hacks that are right up my alley. If you work in LAMP, check it out!

Tuesday, October 18, 2005

Do You Have Gray Data?

The Gray Web -- Hidden in Plain Sight

There are many who have commented on the differences between the "visible web" and the "hidden web." The hidden web is commonly defined as "the publicly accessible pages on the World Wide Web that are not indexed by search engines." To these two webs (visible and hidden) we should add a third web -- the Gray Web. By this I mean publicly accessible pages on the web that are not usefully indexed by search engines today. The Gray Web is both dark and visible at the same time. The Gray Web is composed of the structured data and the timely or rapidly changing data not well supported by most of today's search engines.

Neato!

This is neat: http://www.krazydad.com/visco/
This is how it's done: http://www.krazydad.com/visco/howitworks.php

Monday, October 10, 2005

Linux or Microsoft

Ever wonder if you're looking at Linux or Microsoft driven website? There are two ways to figure this out. The best way: go to Netcraft.co.uk put the domain name into the "What is that site running?" The fast way: change the case of one character in page name (e.g from "index.htm" to "Index.htm"). If you can see the same page, it's a Microsoft page. If you get a "Page Not Found" it's a Linux page.

Thursday, October 06, 2005

Introducting Blogjest

I have put out version 0.1 of Blogjest: http://mike.dewolfe.bc.ca/blogjest/index.html. I could have waited to flesh out my desired feature list and wipe out the bugs, but that may take a while. What you have is a working work-in-progress along with a supporting blog...

Features:
  • Use the Blogjest tool to display a list of feeds from your favorite blogs, RSS and Atom sources.
  • You name several sources (inline or through your own XML document). You name how many stories per feed to show off. When users come to your page, they will see a list of your selected blogs and their recent stories. As those blogs are updated, your blogjest will reflect that.
  • Name color schemes so that the blogjest list can show up on your page in step with the parent page.
Bugs/New Features:
Here are the current signifigant bugs and functions:
  • It cannot process some XML sources: Example A and Example B.
  • I don't have a way to read and decide which RSS source to use. It parses everything as RSS 1.0
  • It uses caching to store second views of XML sources. I would prefer that it saves the document in a database.
  • I would like to build an installation script for Blogjest. It should install the blogjest files and set-up a data source (Access or SQL Server)
  • Display functionality would allow to you to load stylesheets.
  • A way to test XML sources for their existance and formatting.
  • A better way to guess the Blogjest output size.
  • A way to shrink the parent frame size to match the output size of the Blogjest output.
Help:
Do you want to help with the bug list? That would be cool. Really cool. I will give full credit to contributors for the branch of Blogjest that I am developing. If you want the source, here it is. If you wish to contact me: mikedewolfe?gmail.com

Tips:

If you wanted to throw me a tip in appreciation for what I have done, please feel free!